DRIVING – State of Mind

Being in the right state of mind is important for the successful execution of one’s duties. And, driving is no different. In fact, in this scenario, it can mean the difference between life and death.

Valerie Davis had just received the sad news that her mother had passed. She rushed toward her 2008 Subaru Forester in an effort to get home to comfort her grieving family. She jetted off, but didn’t make it home. Davis woke up in an hospital.
“When I heard that my mother had died, it was like my mind wasn’t here anymore. I couldn’t think. I just had to go home,” she recounted.


“I woke up in the hospital and I was shocked. My head was killing me and my hand was numb. I didn’t know what had happened,” she continued.

According to Dr Grace Kelly, Davis was in a state of shock. She explained that most persons are unable to focus on hearing unfortunate news, which causes them to go into a state of shock.

“The moment the body goes through shock, persons are not able to make proper judgement,” she said.

She went on to note that on hearing bad news, motorists should try to remain calm while at the steering wheel, to avoid accidents.

“Of course, they need to be focused, as the stress and anxiety can impede their concentration,” she continued.

On driving home from work in her 2009 Suzuki Swift, Arlene Baugh felt a bit fatigued. She was tired – both in mind and body – as she headed to her destination.

The 29-year-old had just joined a line of traffic when she rear-ended the car ahead of her.

She felt confused as to what had happened.

“Up to this day, I still can’t explain what caused the collision. It’s like I was dreaming. My mind wasn’t where I wanted it to be,” she said.

Baugh said the experience was unexplainable and left her trying to figure out what took place and why.

“The feeling was so terrible that I never want to experience that again. It was too much stress for me in one day,” she added.

Source: Jamaica Gleaner

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